Exhausted but proud

Pencil drawing of a branch of Sorbus americana by Wren M. Allen. Botanical illustration of American mountain ash,.

The leafy branch exercise. The parking lot at a local supermarket has a lot of these trees with bright orange berries. It’s probably Sorbus americana, or American mountain ash.

Yesterday I uploaded the last files for the Drawing Fundamentals module of the RBGE Distance Diploma course, 3 hours ahead of the deadline. Each of the exercises in the module provided a progressive challenge to skills and creative approaches. Even though the instructor is sure to point out many details and techniques for improvement, I’m quite pleased with how well many of the pieces have turned out.

Completing the 15 drawings to spec was a real challenge–and not just technically. An important skill for this course is time management, and I’m not afraid to admit I seriously have some growth to do in that area!

The first 9 pieces took 6 weeks. The last 6 took two. Talk about a time crunch!

I never want to work under those stressful conditions again. Surviving, thriving and succeeding on this course requires a sustainability mindset similar to training for a marathon.

Training for the 2002 Houston Marathon taught me 2 lessons:

  • Consistent, less intense training sessions add up over time.
  • You can skip 1 or 2 weekly long runs over the 16-week training period, but more than that will cost you the chance to finish the race.

So what is sustainability training for a botanical artist? The painting module starts at the end of the month. That gives me time to practice some new work habits while progressing on my native tree and botany modules. Oh yeah, and get caught up on housework!

The fruit of winter’s labor: A painting of red Indian corn

"Red Indian Corn" colored pencil and watercolor on paper, 30" x 22", by Wren M. Allen.

So many details! Working on this 30″ x 22″ mixed-media (colored pencil and watercolor on paper) painting, “Red Indian Corn,” challenged and developed my rendering skills.

I’m so pleased to share this image with you all! This depiction of an ear of red Indian (or decorative) corn has been challenging me all autumn and winter long. First came the difficulty of composing the contour drawing, with the wildly flying dried leaves of the husk. Then figuring out how to render the glossy texture and subtle colorings of the kernels became an obsession. My final quest was balancing the pale, dramatic movement of the husk against the weight of the darker column of the cob.

This particular ear of corn ignited my inspiration over the other corn cobs I bought at an Española farm stand because of its wild, waving leaves curving around the vertical cob in a perfect example of Matisse’s “arabesque”. My working title, in fact, was “Wild-Haired”.

At the beginning of March, I realized I might actually be able to make an exhibit submissions deadline if I could complete the image. All my creative time this month has been devoted to this beauty, instead of blogging or working on my classwork for Lisa Coddington’s spring bulbs course. Time well spent, I’d say! 🙂

A great weekend to all!

Groovy Links of the Month: Ideas for field sketching kits

A pencil and a sketchbook are the bare minimum supplies for a travelling artist!

Truly, this is all you need to enjoy sketching nature outdoors!

This year, for some reason, I have felt compelled to switch up my ordinary travel sketching kit. In February, I took pastels to the Grand Canyon. In August, I took a variety of materials to the Grand Canyon and Zion, but ended up using my tried and tested watercolor and ink pen method the most. For the Bosque del Apache birdwatching trip, I used just my favorite mechanical pencil and a cold-press, mixed-media paper sketchbook that was part of the equipment list from a workshop at the ASBA conference.

I love to see the field-sketching kits used by other outdoor and nature artists. Every artist who works outdoors on a regular basis develops a preference for some materials and gear over others. Below are some ingenious ideas for ways to make drawing and painting on location more comfortable and practical.

Hope you enjoy taking a peek at these ingenious set-ups, and maybe get some ideas for your next outdoor painting foray. If you have an interesting tip or idea for traveling with a sketchbook, please share it in the comments!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...