Intrepid Women: Annie E. Hoyle

Pen and ink drawing by USDA Forest Service artist Annie E Hoyle 1851-1931

Annie E. Hoyle created this rendering of Balsamorhiza sagittate for the USDA Forest Service, one of over 500 pen and ink botanical illustrations she produced for the agency between 1908 and 1930. The variety of stipple and line textures in this wildflower image are very subtle and delicate. Photo credit: USDA Forest Service Collection, Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

One of the things I’ve really enjoyed about the Native Tree Portfolio project for the RBGE diploma is the opportunity to learn all kinds of interesting and unexpected things. While researching images of the piñon pine for the art history paper component of the portfolio, I discovered the work of a US Forest Service artist, Annie Elizabeth Hoyle.

Photo of the USDA Forest Service Engineering Staff in 1924.

The Engineering staff of the Washington Office, US Forest Service, March 1924. Photo from US Forest Service Headquarters History Collection at the Forest History Society. Botanical illustrator Annie Elizabeth Hoyle is the woman in the bottom left hand corner of the photo. Formidable!

Annie E. Hoyle was a remarkable woman. Born in West Virginia in 1851, she studied under George H. Story at the National Academy of Design in New York, followed by studies in human anatomy and anatomical drawing at London’s Royal Academy of Art, then studied two more years in Paris and Luxembourg. She also studied plant morphology and botany under Joseph Painter at the US National Museum (now Smithsonian) and Ivar Tidestrom at the Bureau of Plant Industry. She began working for the USDA Forest Service in 1908, when she was in her late 50s, and continued working until 1930, requesting and receiving five deferments to her final retirement. During her tenure at the Forest Service, “Mrs. Hoyle”, as she was known, was the preferred staff artist of scientists such as George B. Sudworth. She died in 1931.

Amorpha occidentalis, a North American wildflower, rendered in pen and ink by USDA Forest Service botanical illustrator, Annie E Hoyle

Notice the variety of textures and “colors” made by the linear ink hatching. Amorpha occidentalis, by Annie E. Hoyle. Photo credit:  USDA Forest Service Collection, Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

Such a minimal outline for a life serves only to whet the imagination! Allow me to speculate wildly about this most intrepid woman.

How does a 19th-century girl get from West Virgina to studying at the National Academy of Design in New York? Very few women in that era were able to pursue higher studies in art, and certainly not at the most elite schools in American and Europe. One such woman was the formidable Impressionist Mary Cassatt, but she was born into an extremely wealthy and socially prominent Main Line Philadelphia family. Wealthy and socially progressive families were rather thin on the ground in Charleston, WV, Hoyle’s home town.

Unlike Mary Cassatt or Berthe Morisot, both of whom painted warm domestic subject matter of women and children, or Rosa Bonheur, who specialized in Romantic portraits of animals, Annie E Hoyle studied anatomical art and advanced botany, balancing science and art.

And what about her name? There is only one family name recorded for Annie E. Hoyle. She was known as “Mrs. Hoyle” at the US Forest Service offices, but there is no record of a maiden name. Did she assume the honorific “Mrs.” while studying in Europe in order to avoid the harassment that single women traveling and living alone almost certainly faced at that time? Did she use the title after a divorce?

North American wildflower Amelanchier alnifolia. Botanical illustration for the USDA Forest Service by Annie E Hoyle and James M Shull

Amelanchier alnifolia, pen and ink botanical illustration by Annie E Hoyle with James M Shull. The illustrations in the USDA Forest Service Collection are pen and ink working drawings. Here you can see the adhesive tape, editorial corrections, printer’s instructions and other records of the publishing process. Photo credit: USDA Forest Service Collection, Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

The fact that she worked until she was nearly 80 indicates that she had no family to care for her in her old age. Did she have children and a husband at some point, but outlived them all? That’s a definite possibility in that era. Perhaps she was the spinster daughter and sister of her family, estranged due to her eccentric and stubborn choice of an artistic career?

I hope you enjoyed learning about Annie E. Hoyle, a most intrepid and strong-minded woman! What do you think about her work and life story? Leave your thoughts in the comments! 🙂

Resources:

 

Some birdwatching tips

Improve the odds of seeing interesting birds on your hikes.

Not all birds are as cooperative as a mourning dove at a bird feeder! Photo by the Wrenaissance Man.

My tally for the Great Backyard Bird Count was embarrassingly paltry—2 American robins. Hardly worth uploading the results to the website. The towhees, flickers, and pestilent red finches that are usually hopping about our house and yard were nowhere to be seen. Even the ever-present ravens made themselves scarce during my designated 15-minute observation period.

Of course, I had forgotten one of the cardinal rules of birdwatching: Go out when the birds are most active. Here are some tips on how to observe more birds, if you were like me and have a hard time seeing birds when you go out hiking or walking:

  • Go out when the birds are most active. Generally, that’s just before sunrise and sunset. Those awesome videos of starlings flying in formation? They were nearly all shot near sunset, as the flock was looking for a roost for the night.
  • Look where birds like to feed and water. Trees and bushes that bear fruit or nuts attract hungry birds. Puddles after rain showers are popular for bathing and drinking. Or you can set up a feeder and birdbath in your backyard.
  • Be willing to sit quietly in one spot for a while. Our human tendency is to talk loudly and move around suddenly. This makes birds nervous. Try just siting and looking around, allowing the birds to get comfortable and start acting naturally again.
  • Learn the different songs and calls of the birds you want to see. You would be amazed just how many more birds you can identify once you learn what they sound like!

Resources:

Now that birdwatching season is starting to heat up, these websites are a great source for info and advice.

Monday Morning Inspiration: Starting the slow season of slog

Just pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and start all over again. Don't give up on your creative goals for 2015!

Just get back in the saddle and ride, cowgirl.

It’s easy to work on your creative goals in January. You’re all fired up with energy from the holiday break and enthusiastic about all the great ideas you have for painting or writing projects in the coming year.

But by the end of the month, you’re running out of steam. It’s a lot harder to make one idea become reality than to keep dreaming up new ideas!

Or at least, I know I always have a problem keeping the zest alive once February begins! The Indian corn project I’m working on is a lot of insanely tiny rendering details. It’s so easy to allow myself to get distracted with other projects around the house or scroll through all the exciting things other people are doing online.

One thing that helped me get back on track was watching the film Tim’s Vermeer. (Thanks for the tip, ArtL8dy! 🙂 ) One of the notable things about the project Tim took on was just how much time painting all those little details required, and how much his energy ebbed and flowed throughout the process. It really helped re-energize me on my own detailed piece.

Here are some other ideas for regaining that creative mojo and making those exciting New Year’s plans come true.

  • Have your work area set up and ready to go all the time. This one deserves its own post! Seriously, if you have your current project and tools all laid out on the desk all the time, it’s so much easier to take advantage of any free time that comes your way.
  • Cut down on the number of things you have to do before you can do what you want to do. This is a toughie, especially if your creative work time is scheduled at the end of the day. You have to get home, change clothes, walk the dog, make supper, clean up supper, supervise homework, put the kids and dogs to bed, and only then can you start working on that novel. Whew! That to-do list is enough to exhaust anyone! The nice thing about working early in the morning is that you only need to roll out of bed and make a cup of coffee before you sit down at the drawing table. Other ways to cut your pre-studio to-do list are enlisting other family members to handle some of those chores or re-scheduling them to a more convenient time.
  • Get the electronics out of your studio. Just like sleep experts tell you to get the tv and computer out of the bedroom to get a good night’s sleep, so you should keep the digital toys out of your studio so you can focus on creating ideas instead of consuming other people’s. If you really *must* listen to music on your smartphone, dump the social media apps off it so they don’t distract you. If your work is digital, whether on a word processor or a graphics program, use an app like Self-Control to block the internet and email while you’re working.
  • Give yourself little rewards before, during and after your studio time. Make a cup of hot cocoa for that early morning session, or play your favorite music while you paint. Take the dog out for a brisk walk after you’ve hunched over your drawing table for a couple of hours.
  • Remember you’re in it for the long haul. When I lived in Norway, there was a newspaper article one Christmas season where the reporter asked a famous nutritionist about how to eat and stay slim during the holidays. He answered, “It’s not how you eat between December 1 and January 1 that matters as much as how you eat between January 1 and December 1.” Creative work is not like starting to jog on New Year’s Day and training for a 10-k race in 6 months. It’s like staying fit and enjoying exercise throughout your life. If you skip too many training runs, you might miss the race. But if you want to stay healthy, it’s more important to just get active on most days, even if you can’t manage a “perfect” workout every day. Achieving your creative goals is about doing a little something most days, and not beating yourself up about the weeks that go wrong.

What helps you get back in the saddle when you’ve had a creative dry spell?

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...