Intrepid Women: Annie E. Hoyle

Pen and ink drawing by USDA Forest Service artist Annie E Hoyle 1851-1931

Annie E. Hoyle created this rendering of Balsamorhiza sagittate for the USDA Forest Service, one of over 500 pen and ink botanical illustrations she produced for the agency between 1908 and 1930. The variety of stipple and line textures in this wildflower image are very subtle and delicate. Photo credit: USDA Forest Service Collection, Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

One of the things I’ve really enjoyed about the Native Tree Portfolio project for the RBGE diploma is the opportunity to learn all kinds of interesting and unexpected things. While researching images of the piñon pine for the art history paper component of the portfolio, I discovered the work of a US Forest Service artist, Annie Elizabeth Hoyle.

Photo of the USDA Forest Service Engineering Staff in 1924.

The Engineering staff of the Washington Office, US Forest Service, March 1924. Photo from US Forest Service Headquarters History Collection at the Forest History Society. Botanical illustrator Annie Elizabeth Hoyle is the woman in the bottom left hand corner of the photo. Formidable!

Annie E. Hoyle was a remarkable woman. Born in West Virginia in 1851, she studied under George H. Story at the National Academy of Design in New York, followed by studies in human anatomy and anatomical drawing at London’s Royal Academy of Art, then studied two more years in Paris and Luxembourg. She also studied plant morphology and botany under Joseph Painter at the US National Museum (now Smithsonian) and Ivar Tidestrom at the Bureau of Plant Industry. She began working for the USDA Forest Service in 1908, when she was in her late 50s, and continued working until 1930, requesting and receiving five deferments to her final retirement. During her tenure at the Forest Service, “Mrs. Hoyle”, as she was known, was the preferred staff artist of scientists such as George B. Sudworth. She died in 1931.

Amorpha occidentalis, a North American wildflower, rendered in pen and ink by USDA Forest Service botanical illustrator, Annie E Hoyle

Notice the variety of textures and “colors” made by the linear ink hatching. Amorpha occidentalis, by Annie E. Hoyle. Photo credit:  USDA Forest Service Collection, Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

Such a minimal outline for a life serves only to whet the imagination! Allow me to speculate wildly about this most intrepid woman.

How does a 19th-century girl get from West Virgina to studying at the National Academy of Design in New York? Very few women in that era were able to pursue higher studies in art, and certainly not at the most elite schools in American and Europe. One such woman was the formidable Impressionist Mary Cassatt, but she was born into an extremely wealthy and socially prominent Main Line Philadelphia family. Wealthy and socially progressive families were rather thin on the ground in Charleston, WV, Hoyle’s home town.

Unlike Mary Cassatt or Berthe Morisot, both of whom painted warm domestic subject matter of women and children, or Rosa Bonheur, who specialized in Romantic portraits of animals, Annie E Hoyle studied anatomical art and advanced botany, balancing science and art.

And what about her name? There is only one family name recorded for Annie E. Hoyle. She was known as “Mrs. Hoyle” at the US Forest Service offices, but there is no record of a maiden name. Did she assume the honorific “Mrs.” while studying in Europe in order to avoid the harassment that single women traveling and living alone almost certainly faced at that time? Did she use the title after a divorce?

North American wildflower Amelanchier alnifolia. Botanical illustration for the USDA Forest Service by Annie E Hoyle and James M Shull

Amelanchier alnifolia, pen and ink botanical illustration by Annie E Hoyle with James M Shull. The illustrations in the USDA Forest Service Collection are pen and ink working drawings. Here you can see the adhesive tape, editorial corrections, printer’s instructions and other records of the publishing process. Photo credit: USDA Forest Service Collection, Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

The fact that she worked until she was nearly 80 indicates that she had no family to care for her in her old age. Did she have children and a husband at some point, but outlived them all? That’s a definite possibility in that era. Perhaps she was the spinster daughter and sister of her family, estranged due to her eccentric and stubborn choice of an artistic career?

I hope you enjoyed learning about Annie E. Hoyle, a most intrepid and strong-minded woman! What do you think about her work and life story? Leave your thoughts in the comments! 🙂

Resources:

 

Bluebird winter days

Pinon pinecone lightly dusted with snow against a deep blue New Mexico sky.

A happy weekend to you from the sun- and snow-kissed Land of Enchantment!

El Niño has come to the desert southwest with generous snowfalls! This periodic warm-water oscillation in the Pacific Ocean provides much needed extra precipatation for the desert climates of the southwestern US and northern Mexico. Santa Fe is currently about 8″ ahead of average snowfall, and the rest of the state is enjoying greater than normal amounts of the fluffy white stuff as well.

The winter got off to a good start with a first snow in the high desert around my house on November 5. After a road-closing blizzard right before New Year’s, we’ve had smaller but meaningful snowfalls throughout the winter.

For all you skiers, Ski New Mexico has a regularly updated snow report for all resorts in the state.

The winter season is a wonderful time to enjoy the outdoors here in New Mexico. Even though the weather is milder than the northern tier of states, don’t forget common sense and safety precautions when you hit the trails. Dress in layers and be sure to include a waterproof outer layer in case of snow. Carry along plenty of water and snacks in your daypack, and off-piste safety gear. A fleece blanket in your car is a good idea, if you get stuck.

How will you be spending your beautiful weekend?

Happy New Year: Inner growth or outer goals?

Amaryllis flower buds symbolize growth and hope for the new year.

A bulb contains inside itself all the energy it needs to grow into a beautiful flower.

2016 is off to a big bang, at least in my studio! Another painting module has begun, I’m in the research phase for two art history papers, and tomorrow I go to the natural history museum in Albuquerque to examine and draw a pine borer beetle for the Native Tree project.

Busy, busy, busy!

Has the new year started off at great speed for you, too?

At the start of every year, I usually take some time to share my goals or hopes for the year ahead and make suggestions for interesting reading about goals and resolutions (see here for 2015, for 2014, for 2013, and for 2012.)

It seems to me that the most easily achieved goals are external ones. They are easy to accomplish because you can directly measure them, put them on a schedule or deadline. They are concrete. You either lost 10 pounds or you didn’t. You threw out your old paperwork and organized your office, or it’s still messy. You went to the gym 3x a week, or you stayed home and watched tv.

Etc, etc.

But what about internal goals?

This year, I realized that I need to do some deep growth work on my inner self, both physical, mental and spiritual. In December, I was at a doctor’s office for my shoulder and neck injury, and he said, “What you do now for fitness in your fifties is what will set you up for good health in your sixties, seventies and late old age.”

I realized that his statement didn’t just apply to my body, but also my soul.

All those mental mechanisms that each of us has to defend ourselves from the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune get stronger and more automatic as we age. They get so powerful that finally they don’t work anymore! Instead of helping us cope, they hinder us from thriving!

What do we do then?

  • We have to abandon our old crusty forts of self-defense.
  • We must learn to observe reality without inserting our old interpretive filters.
  • We need to re-connect to others and allow ourselves to be open to the moment instead of responding to the past.
  • We have to grow.

The problem is, that growth is very hard to quantify. It’s impossible to be 10 pounds happier! You can’t do 50 patience crunches every morning before work. 😉

Inner growth is an easy goal to abandon because it’s hard to see progress. But sometimes, you need to change so you can be easier and freer as you move into the next stage of life.

So my mantra for 2016 is, “Heal within.” I want to heal my shoulder, my brain and my heart. I want to be able to be fit and strong inside and out for a happy old age.

What is your vision for this brand new year of 2016?

Warmest wishes for happiness and health to you all in this New Year!

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